Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees - Graphics

This is a discussion on Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees - Graphics ; Hi: Please, can you tell me how rotate in 90 degrees this gnuplot graphics ? I want a horizontal histogram, but I´m only getting a vertical histogram: reset set boxwidth 0.66 absolute set style fill solid 1.00 noborder set style ...

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Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees

  1. Default Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees



    Hi:

    Please, can you tell me how rotate in 90 degrees this gnuplot
    graphics ?
    I want a horizontal histogram, but I´m only getting a vertical
    histogram:

    reset
    set boxwidth 0.66 absolute
    set style fill solid 1.00 noborder
    set style line 1 lw 0 lc rgb "#000080"
    set style line 2 lw 0 lc rgb "#33339A"
    set style line 3 lw 0 lc rgb "#C0C0C0"
    set style line 4 lw 0 lc rgb "#FF9A00"
    set style line 5 lw 0 lc rgb "#FF0000"
    set style increment user
    set key off
    set style histogram rowstacked
    set style data histograms
    set xtics border in scale 1,0.5 nomirror rotate by 90
    unset ytics
    unset border
    set yrange [0:100]
    # just formating until here
    set terminal emf size 300,700
    set output 'stackedbar.emf'
    plot 'stackedbar2.dat' using 3:xticlabels(2), '' using 4, '' using 5,
    \
    '' using 6, '' using 7 ,\
    '' using 1$3/2):3 with labels rotate by 90 textcolor rgb "white",
    \
    '' using 1$3+$4/2):4 with labels rotate by 90 textcolor rgb
    "white",\
    '' using 1$3+$4+$5/2):5 with labels rotate by 90 ,\
    '' using 1$3+$4+$5+$6/2):6 with labels rotate by 90 ,\
    '' using 1$3+$4+$5+$6+$7/2):7 with labels rotate by 90
    set output


  2. Default Re: Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees

    valdemirs@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    > Hi:
    >
    > Please, can you tell me how rotate in 90 degrees this gnuplot
    > graphics ?
    > I want a horizontal histogram, but I´m only getting a vertical
    > histogram:


    Right. Since gnuplot doesn't support horizontal histograms, the example
    is just a hack to get something looking horizontal (from the right
    perspective).
    You will have to rotate the graphics with the external graphics tool of
    your choice.

  3. Default Re: Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees

    On 4 jun, 19:42, Tim Hoffmann <tim.hoffm...@uni-bonn.de> wrote:
    > valdem...@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    > > Hi:

    >
    > > Please, can you tell me how rotate in 90 degrees this gnuplot
    > > graphics ?
    > > I want a horizontal histogram, but I´m only getting a vertical
    > > histogram:

    >
    > Right. Since gnuplot doesn't support horizontal histograms, the example
    > is just a hack to get something looking horizontal (from the right
    > perspective).
    > You will have to rotate the graphics with the external graphics tool of
    > your choice.


    Is there any gnuplot command to create horizontal rectangles ?

  4. Default Re: Re: Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees

    In article <4bbe6f4f-8c61-43c1-8577-a3e9ec4babe4@t12g2000prg.googlegroups.com>,
    <valdemirs@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >Is there any gnuplot command to create horizontal rectangles ?


    ???
    How can you tell a horizontal rectangle from a vertical rectangle?


    There is a strong convention in scientific presentation that the
    independent variable is plotted on the horizontal axis (usually X),
    and dependent variables are plotted against the vertical axis (Y).

    Of course there are specific cases that call for some other layout,
    but it is rare to see horizontal histograms.

    --
    Ethan A Merritt

  5. Default Re: Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees

    On Jun 4, 6:30 pm, merr...@u.washington.edu (Ethan Merritt) wrote:
    > In article <4bbe6f4f-8c61-43c1-8577-a3e9ec4ba...@t12g2000prg.googlegroups.com>,
    >
    > <valdem...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Is there any gnuplot command to create horizontal rectangles ?

    >
    > ???
    > How can you tell a horizontal rectangle from a vertical rectangle?
    >
    > There is a strong convention in scientific presentation that the
    > independent variable is plotted on the horizontal axis (usually X),
    > and dependent variables are plotted against the vertical axis (Y).
    >
    > Of course there are specific cases that call for some other layout,
    > but it is rare to see horizontal histograms.


    Who has never seen this example:
    http://www.censusscope.org/us/chart_age.html

    This sort of thing is not at all rare in newspapers and
    magazines, or indeed any publication where page
    layout conventions trump scientific conventions.


    Dan

  6. Default Re: Re: Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees

    In article <c5dbd041-1700-4f30-a172-ce42bd5ad879@m3g2000hsc.googlegroups.com>,
    Dan <luecking@uark.edu> wrote:
    >On Jun 4, 6:30 pm, merr...@u.washington.edu (Ethan Merritt) wrote:
    >> In article <4bbe6f4f-8c61-43c1-8577-a3e9ec4ba...@t12g2000prg.googlegroups.com>,
    >>
    >> <valdem...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >Is there any gnuplot command to create horizontal rectangles ?

    >>
    >> ???
    >> How can you tell a horizontal rectangle from a vertical rectangle?
    >>
    >> There is a strong convention in scientific presentation that the
    >> independent variable is plotted on the horizontal axis (usually X),
    >> and dependent variables are plotted against the vertical axis (Y).
    >>
    >> Of course there are specific cases that call for some other layout,
    >> but it is rare to see horizontal histograms.

    >
    >Who has never seen this example:
    > http://www.censusscope.org/us/chart_age.html


    FWIW, here's the gnuplot equivalent, cut-and-pasting the
    data from that URL.
    http://skuld.bmsc.washington.edu/peo...ot/census.html

    I know of that style as a "back-to-back" histogram.
    There was recently discussion on the developers mailing list
    about the possibility of implementing a more general form of
    this sometimes called a "violin plot", e.g.
    http://addictedtor.free.fr/graphique...y.php?graph=43

    Drawing such a set of curves in gnuplot would not be hard,
    but working out a standard way of getting the relevant data
    into the program would be non-trivial.

    >This sort of thing is not at all rare in newspapers and
    >magazines, or indeed any publication where page
    >layout conventions trump scientific conventions.


    Surely you are not appealing to newspaper/magazine standards
    as a touchstone for the presentation of scientific data!


    --
    Ethan A Merritt

  7. Default Re: Rotating gnuplot graphic´s output in 90 degrees

    On Jun 5, 2:02 pm, merr...@chauvet.bmsc.washington.edu wrote:
    > In article <c5dbd041-1700-4f30-a172-ce42bd5ad...@m3g2000hsc.googlegroups.com>,
    >
    >
    >
    > Dan <lueck...@uark.edu> wrote:
    > >On Jun 4, 6:30 pm, merr...@u.washington.edu (Ethan Merritt) wrote:

    [...]
    >
    > >> Of course there are specific cases that call for some other layout,
    > >> but it is rare to see horizontal histograms.


    Note the phrase "rare to see"

    >
    > >This sort of thing is not at all rare in newspapers and
    > >magazines, or indeed any publication where page
    > >layout conventions trump scientific conventions.


    Note the phrase "not at all rare".

    >
    > Surely you are not appealing to newspaper/magazine standards
    > as a touchstone for the presentation of scientific data!


    Clearly, the point I made was that they are not "rare to see",
    considering all the things even we "scientists" might see.

    I also *thought* it was clear that what I said was something
    of a put-down ("layout... trumps... science..."? I hardly think
    so.)

    So, removing my tongue from my cheek: No, I don't think
    that newspapers and magazines standards should guide our
    presentation of scientific data.

    I do, however think there are cases where a vertical axis
    for the independent variable can be the best choice for
    scientific presentation. And even scientists may have to
    write for magazines and newspapers on occasion. In those
    cases, fitting the graph to the layout could conceivably
    make the entire presentation better.


    Dan

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