Visual "clipping"? - Other Technologies

This is a discussion on Visual "clipping"? - Other Technologies ; On Mon, 03 Sep 2007 20:27:43 -0700, isw <isw@witzend.com> wrote: >Clipping causes whites lose all texture -- very similar to overexposed >film. White clipping makes you loose the texture, and some other interesting things occur, like the clipped area turning ...

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Visual "clipping"?

  1. Default Re: Visual "clipping"?

    On Mon, 03 Sep 2007 20:27:43 -0700, isw <isw@witzend.com> wrote:

    >Clipping causes whites lose all texture -- very similar to overexposed
    >film.


    White clipping makes you loose the texture, and some other interesting
    things occur, like the clipped area turning yellowish (solarization).
    But it's not only white which can clip, with colour-correction you can
    easily clip one of the three colour-channels. And of course you can clip
    black as well, loosing shadow detail.

    >> Auditory-clipping can damage speakers. Can visual-"clipping" damage
    >> monitors?

    >
    >No. Prolonged blacks can damage television transmitters, however (video
    >is inverted for transmission, so black requires full power from the
    >transmitter).


    I would say the transmitters would be resistant to that. Most run below
    their designed maximum power anyway.

    cheers

    -martin-
    --
    Official website "Jonah's Quid" http://www.jonahsquids.co.uk

  2. Default Re: Visual "clipping"?

    In article <1188878846.842063.33390@d55g2000hsg.googlegroups.com>,
    Radium <glucegen1@gmail.com> wrote:

    > On Sep 3, 8:27 pm, isw <i...@witzend.com> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <1188874984.222039.197...@y42g2000hsy.googlegroups.com>,

    >
    > > Radium <gluceg...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > Hi:

    >
    > > > Clipping in an audio signal results when an audio device receives a
    > > > signal that is too loud. The audio signal distorts into square-waves
    > > > because the "tops" of the signal are flattened. The device cannot
    > > > handle power levels over a certain level. When this level is exceeded,
    > > > clipping occurs. Clipping is usually harsher in digital devices than
    > > > in ****og devices. ****og clipping tends to be fuzzy and soft compared
    > > > to digital clipping.

    >
    > > > What is the visual-equivalent of "clipping"? Is there a difference
    > > > between ****og and digital in terms of visual-clipping? If so, what is
    > > > the difference?

    >
    > > Clipping causes whites lose all texture -- very similar to overexposed
    > > film.

    >
    > What does this look like on a screen?


    Just as I said: white areas with no texture.

    > > > Auditory-clipping can damage speakers. Can visual-"clipping" damage
    > > > monitors?

    >
    > > No. Prolonged blacks can damage television transmitters, however (video
    > > is inverted for transmission, so black requires full power from the
    > > transmitter).

    >
    > Prolonged black can damage a monitor/screen? That's weird. White is
    > ****ogous to the loudest sound a loudspeaker can playback. Black is
    > ****ogous to a loudspeaker not being feed any signal.


    I did not say "monitor"; I said "transmitter". There *is* a difference.

    > When the power-supply of the monitor/screen is turned off, the monitor/
    > screen is black because it not receiving any voltage.


    It's not voltage; it's current, that determines brightness during the
    normal operation of a monitor.

    > I would think that extremely-bright white would damage the screen
    > because the brightest white results from the highest voltage applied
    > to the Reds, Greens, and Blues [equal intensities of R, G, & B -- if
    > combined -- appear white to our eyes when emitted by an electronic
    > monitor] in a particular area of the monitor/screen.


    Actually it's not voltage; it's current.

    And it takes a long time for overdriving to cause damage to an ordinary
    monitor.

    > Wouldn't something similar happen to a
    > monitor/screen [whether it's a CRT, plasma, or LCD] if it was forced
    > to display light-intensities beyond its limits?


    CRT's possibly, over a long period of time. LCDs, never. The LCD part is
    just a bunch of "valves"; the light source is usually a fluorescent lamp
    of some sort. No possibility of "burning anything out".

    I have been involved with very special CRT-based imaging devices where
    an uncontrolled momentary pulse would destroy the phosphor -- and in
    fact, *drill a pit in the glass of the faceplate*. But that is unlikely
    to ever happen to a CRT used as a video monitor.

    Isaac

  3. Default Re: Visual "clipping"?

    Radium <glucegen1@gmail.com> wrote:

    [..]
    > What is the visual-equivalent of "clipping"?


    Blowouts.

    > Is there a difference between ****og and digital in terms of
    > visual-clipping?


    Yup.

    > If so, what is the difference?


    Google is your friend.

    --
    http://www.xoverboard.com/cartoons/2..._argument.html

  4. Default Re: Visual "clipping"?

    Martin Heffels wrote:
    > On Mon, 03 Sep 2007 20:27:43 -0700, isw <isw@witzend.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Clipping causes whites lose all texture -- very similar to overexposed
    >> film.

    >
    > White clipping makes you loose the texture, and some other interesting
    > things occur, like the clipped area turning yellowish (solarization).
    > But it's not only white which can clip, with colour-correction you can
    > easily clip one of the three colour-channels. And of course you can clip
    > black as well, loosing shadow detail.
    >
    >>> Auditory-clipping can damage speakers. Can visual-"clipping" damage
    >>> monitors?

    >> No. Prolonged blacks can damage television transmitters, however (video
    >> is inverted for transmission, so black requires full power from the
    >> transmitter).

    >
    > I would say the transmitters would be resistant to that. Most run below
    > their designed maximum power anyway.


    Guess it's more of a THEORETICAL damage

    I think the point is, the way they work, it's POSSIBLE, if unlikely.

  5. Default Re: Visual "clipping"?

    On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 07:20:55 GMT, Matt Ion <soundy106@gmail.com> wrote:

    >I think the point is, the way they work, it's POSSIBLE, if unlikely.


    Yes of course :-) They would switch off with all the protections in place.
    But it must have happened at one stage, otherwise it wouldn't be known.

    -m-
    --
    Official website "Jonah's Quid" http://www.jonahsquids.co.uk

  6. Default Re: Mental clipping

    Radium seems to be a good example of mental clipping. Brain attempting to
    think far beyond it's capacity



  7. Default Re: Visual "clipping"?

    Radium wrote:

    (snip)

    > What is the visual-equivalent of "clipping"? Is there a difference
    > between ****og and digital in terms of visual-clipping? If so, what is
    > the difference?


    Clipping results from the saturation of the system, ****og or digital.
    That should be true for audio or video.

    > Auditory-clipping can damage speakers. Can visual-"clipping" damage
    > monitors?


    In general, audio clipping does not damage speakers. The usual
    case that causes damage is the combination of a few things:

    Using multiple drivers to cover a large frequency range, with
    a crossover network to divide up the signal.

    Musical audio has much more power at lower frequencies than higher
    frequencies, so speakers are designed appropriately.

    Clipping generates a lot of power at the higher harmonics of the
    input frequencies that goes to drivers not designed for
    those power levels.

    In most video systems this combination doesn't exist. It might
    in future video reproduction systems, though.

    -- glen


  8. Default Re: Visual "clipping"?

    On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 05:01:19 GMT, Matt Ion wrote:

    >> Try to force 100,000,000 lumens out of a square-shaped, pinky-finger-
    >> sized area of an LCD monitor. Now what would happen? Would the organic
    >> material present in that area catch fire?

    >
    > And how exactly would one do that, since LCDs don't actually produce
    > light on their own?


    You and I couldn't, but an engineer/technician working for a
    company such as GE, Westinghouse, Philips or Osram might go mad and
    try something like that. If we suffered that same fate we might try
    applying 240V A.C. to a 2.6v PR2 bulb to see "what would happen".


  9. Default Re: Visual "clipping"?

    On Sep 3, 10:03 pm, Radium <gluceg...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Hi:
    >
    > Clipping in an audio signal results when an audio device receives a
    > signal that is too loud. The audio signal distorts into square-waves
    > because the "tops" of the signal are flattened. The device cannot
    > handle power levels over a certain level. When this level is exceeded,
    > clipping occurs. Clipping is usually harsher in digital devices than
    > in ****og devices. ****og clipping tends to be fuzzy and soft compared
    > to digital clipping.
    >
    > What is the visual-equivalent of "clipping"? Is there a difference
    > between ****og and digital in terms of visual-clipping? If so, what is
    > the difference?
    >
    > Auditory-clipping can damage speakers. Can visual-"clipping" damage
    > monitors?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Radium


    Yes, there IS a difference between ****og and digital processing. The
    ****og effect depends on the stability of the ****og signal
    processing. This effect would appear on the horizontal trace of a TV
    signal (part of the video path on today's TVs are still ****og, even
    with a "digital tuner". It can cause a ringing after the saturation,
    and "artifacts" beyond the clipped area.

    If certain types of processing are used, especially sharpening, in
    digital signal processing, such artifacts can also end up surrounding
    (in both directions) a clipped area.


  10. Default Re: Visual "clipping"?

    On 9/3/07 9:07 PM, in article
    1188878846.842063.33390@d55g2000hsg.googlegroups.com, "Radium"
    <glucegen1@gmail.com> wrote:

    > On Sep 3, 8:27 pm, isw <i...@witzend.com> wrote:
    >

    snip
    >
    >> No. Prolonged blacks can damage television transmitters, however (video
    >> is inverted for transmission, so black requires full power from the
    >> transmitter).

    >
    > Prolonged black can damage a monitor/screen? That's weird. White is
    > ****ogous to the loudest sound a loudspeaker can playback. Black is
    > ****ogous to a loudspeaker not being feed any signal.


    snip

    More Trolling.

    Exactly where did he say prolonged black can damage a monitor/screen


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